AP source: Russian missiles cross into Poland during strike

AP source: Russian missiles cross into Poland during strike

Updated: 16 days, 13 hours, 52 minutes, 2 seconds ago

By JOHN LEICESTER and JAMES LaPORTA

Associated Press

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) -- Russia pounded Ukraine's energy facilities Tuesday with its biggest barrage of missiles yet, striking targets across the country and causing widespread blackouts. A senior U.S. intelligence official said missiles crossed into NATO member Poland, where two people were killed.

A second person confirmed to The Associated Press that apparent Russian missiles struck a site in Poland about 15 miles from the Ukrainian border.

The Russian Defense Ministry denied being behind "any strikes on targets near the Ukrainian-Polish border" and said in a statement that photos of purported damage "have nothing to do" with Russian weapons.

A NATO official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said the alliance was looking into reports of a strike in Poland. The U.S. National Security Council said it was also looking into the reports.

Polish government spokesman Piotr Mueller did not immediately confirm the information from the U.S. intelligence official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitive nature of the situation. But Mueller said top leaders were holding an emergency meeting due to a "crisis situation."

Polish media reported that two people died Tuesday afternoon after a projectile struck an area where grain was drying in Przewodów, a Polish village near the border with Ukraine.

Neighboring Moldova was also affected. It reported massive power outages after the strikes knocked out a key power line that supplies the small nation, an official said.

The missile strikes plunged much of Ukraine into darkness and drew defiance from President Volodymr Zelenskyy, who shook his fist and declared: "We will survive everything."

Zelenskyy said Russia fired at least 85 missiles, most of them aimed at the country's power facilities, and blacked out many cities.

His energy minister said the attack was "the most massive" bombardment of power facilities in the nearly 9-month-old Russian invasion, striking both power generation and transmission systems.

The aerial assault, which resulted in at least one death in a residential building in the capital, Kyiv, followed days of euphoria in Ukraine sparked by one of its biggest military successes -- the retaking last week of the southern city of Kherson.

The power grid was already battered by previous attacks that destroyed an estimated 40% of the country's energy infrastructure.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has not commented on the retreat from Kherson since his troops pulled out in the face of a Ukrainian offensive. But the stunning scale of Tuesday's strikes spoke volumes and hinted at anger in the Kremlin.

Zelenskyy warned that more strikes were possible and urged people to stay safe and seek shelter.

With its battlefield losses mounting, Russia has increasingly resorted to targeting Ukraine's power grid, seemingly hoping to turn the approach of winter into a weapon by leaving people in the cold and dark.

Large parts of eastern and southern Ukraine remain under Russian control, and fighting continues.

Zelenskyy warned of possible more grim news ahead.

"Everywhere, when we liberate our land, we see one thing -- Russia leaves behind torture chambers and mass burials. ... How many mass graves are there in the territory that still remains under the control of Russia?" Zelenskyy asked.

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